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🌟Welcome to The Nest🌟 Start Here!
🌟 Welcome to The Nest! 🌟 We're so excited to have you join our community. We'd love for you to introduce yourself to help us grow closer and build a robust and supportive network. Sharing a bit about who you are helps us foster a sense of connection and understanding, which is at the heart of The Nest. Caregiving can often feel like a solitary journey, but here in The Nest, you're never alone. We believe in the power of community to provide comfort, support, and a sense of belonging. Whether you're here to seek advice, share your experiences, or find a listening ear, you're in the right place. So, please tell us a little about yourself - your interests, caregiving journey, or anything else you'd like to share. We're all here to support each other and look forward to getting to know you better! Where are you from? Are you a family caregiver or healthcare professional? What is the biggest challenge at the moment? What do you want immediate help with inside of this community? Let's make The Nest a warm and welcoming space for all caregivers. 🤗💕
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Newsworthy Flashback
This article highlights caregiving during COVID-19, but most still ring true today.https://www.vox.com/22442407/care-for-caregivers-mental-health-covid
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Finding Connection: Uncovering the 'Lanolin' in Alzheimer's Care
"Kelli, I am sorry to bother you on a Saturday morning, but I can't get June out of the car," Sue explained while talking to June and me simultaneously. The car sat in the driveway, a stark contrast against the bright blue sky. The morning air was crisp, carrying a hint of dew, and the vibrant spring flowers were in full bloom, painting the scene with their colors. Sue, the private-duty caregiver, had just returned from a trip to the ER with June. June, battling the symptoms of a UTI, was also grappling with the challenges of Alzheimer's; her vision and hearing were both compromised. Upon my arrival, I called out to June before approaching the car. "Good morning, June, it's me, Kelli." I let that sink in until I noticed the slightest recognition on her face. I placed out my hand, careful not to get too close. Here is my hand. The smell is lanolin, your favorite." Amazingly, June's sense of smell remained mostly intact. I had learned she loved the smell of lanolin, so I tried to have it available. I noticed the slightest smile come to her face as she inhaled the smell of lanolin. Again, I offered my hand and suggested we go inside for tea. June took my hand and allowed me to help her from the car. Here are a few suggestions for helping someone living with Alzheimer's. - To the best of your ability, get to know the person's history/story. This allows you to go with them on their journey.  - Discovering a connection point can be powerful. I found that June loved the smell of lanolin, and I used that to connect with her. Find your own 'lanolin '. It could be the smell of cookies baking, music, or old photos. Regardless, this discovery can empower you to make a significant difference in their life. - Caregivers can offer a wealth of information. Know what questions to ask and document observations to share with your care team. - Clear communication is key. Personalize and update the care plan as needed, ensuring you communicate clearly with the team.  - Respecting personal space is paramount in Alzheimer's caregiving. Always ask for permission before touching or getting too close to the person. This simple act of respect can go a long way in maintaining their dignity and comfort.
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Finding Connection: Uncovering the 'Lanolin' in Alzheimer's Care
How to Host a Family Meeting Without the Drama!
It's Time for a Family Meeting! Caregiving for an elderly parent or relative requires a team approach. It's crucial for all family members, including close friends and even paid caregivers who are part of the support network, to collaborate effectively. Organizing a family meeting is crucial in coordinating care and ensuring everyone is on the same page. I always recommend a planning meeting before the big day. That way, if there are any concerns or disagreements, they can be addressed in advance. Who Should Attend? Include anyone who is or will be involved in caregiving. This might vary from immediate family to a broader circle that includes friends and neighbors. Consider whether the person receiving care should attend depending on their condition and the topics to be discussed. As I said earlier, you should have your planning meeting first and then a smaller, more intimate gathering with close family and friends. The last thing you want is for the person who needs care to feel ambushed. Setting Up the Meeting Use technology like Zoom to include those who can't attend in person. Preparing an agenda and sharing it beforehand helps focus the discussion on important topics like health updates, caregiving roles, financial planning, and emotional support. It can also be helpful to role-play the meeting in advance. That way, you can anticipate those awkward moments or objections. Conducting the Meeting Choose a comfortable and convenient location. Encourage open and respectful communication, allowing everyone to express their feelings and thoughts. It's not about solving all problems in one meeting but about establishing a cooperative plan and understanding each person's role and contributions. Follow-Up Regular meetings are necessary, adapting as situations change. Keep everyone informed through email, calls, or a shared communication platform. When to Seek External Help If the family struggles to work together or faces major disagreements, bringing in a neutral facilitator like a social worker or counselor can help. Support groups like The Nest offer personalized support for your family.
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How to Host a Family Meeting Without the Drama!
Dementia Care Tool👏
Allyson Schier shares her mission for Zinnia. She states that their " mission is to design artistic experiences that improve the quality of life for people living with mid to late-stage memory loss or dementia by bolstering a sense of identity and fostering connection with loved ones and care partners at home and in long-term care settings." The app offers a free trial and monthly or annual memberships. As caregivers and healthcare professionals, we are always looking for ways to improve the quality of life for those living with a dementia-related illness. The aesthetics are beautiful, and this may be a product that can help reduce anxiety and stress for both the person and the caregiver. Here is the link: http://www.zinniatv.com
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Dementia Care Tool👏
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