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Sentence Completions
One of my favorite exercises for accessing subconscious blocks is an exercise called 'Sentence Completions', which got coined by the renowned psychologist and author Dr. Nathaniel Branden. Fitting for the start of the week, I'd like to share these 3 with you: - If I boost my energy level by 5% today, my week....... - If I honor my needs and desires 5% this week, ........ - If I am 5% more self-accepting today, ....... Take a journal and a pen, write them down and simply complete them with whatever comes to mind. Important would be to not judge yourself or pause if you start thinking about what to write. I know this can be extremely difficult in the beginning, but remember: nobody is judging you, nobody is watching you, and this is a safe exercise just for yourself. There is no need to share it with anybody. Of course, you're also welcome to share your results in the comments below!
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Transform Stress into Growth 🌱
Did you know that stress, in the right doses, can actually be beneficial for growth? Research shows that encountering manageable levels of stress can enhance our resilience and motivate us to succeed. This phenomenon, known as 'eustress,' can lead to improved performance and fulfillment in both personal and professional realms. As we step into a new week, let's view our challenges as opportunities for growth. Each obstacle is a stepping stone, guiding us closer to our goals and helping us become the calm warriors we strive to be. Remember, it's not about eliminating stress completely but learning to navigate it constructively. Let’s embrace our journey with an open heart and a resilient mindset. #StressForGrowth #ResilienceBuilding
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Harnessing the Quiet Power of 'Pause'
Community Highlight! 🌟 Did you know? Intentional pauses throughout the day can significantly lower stress levels, increasing creativity and productivity. Let's put this into practice! Today, share one moment where you took a 'strategic pause'—a brief walk, a moment of silence, or even a deep breath—and how it impacted your day. Jump in with your experiences and let's inspire each other to infuse our hustle with the power of pause.
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Allostatic Overload & Why Stress is The Root Cause of Cardiovascular Disease
For this one, I dug deep in my knowledge box... While we've known for a long time that stress is the #1 trigger for diseases, I'll take a step back here and start off with allostatic overload and cardiovascular disease. As part of this group, I'll be sharing more and more stats/research on various illness-related causes. Allostatic overload appears when we've had too much stress - i.e. more stress than our nervous system can handle on any given day. If we experience too much stress on a consistent basis, it starts affecting our nervous system - to the extent that your body will get stressed even when the original trigger isn't present anymore. This is the underlying neurological effect behind chronic dis-ease. The body has experienced a certain stress trigger for some time, and continuous acting as if it was happening even though the original cause has long ceased to exist. Here are 2 short scientific snippets on the topic: "Hormones associated with the chronic stress burden protect the body in the short run and promote adaptation (allostasis), but in the long run, the burden of chronic stress causes changes in the brain and body that can lead to disease (allostatic load and overload)." And further: "Increased amygdala reactivity to angry and sad faces is reported in individuals with early signs of cardiovascular disease, suggesting that the increased sympathetic activity and blood pressure reactivity may be a cause of allostatic load resulting from increased reactivity to daily experiences over time." - McEwen (2012) Are you currently suffering from any chronic pain? If so, which kind?
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How Giving Up Something Pleasurable May Increase Your Happiness
You are very likely familiar with the benefits of fasting...you abstain from something in order to improve your health and enjoy exactly that - health - more and longer. Equally, if, for example, we eat too much chocolate because it makes us happy, the effect of the chocolate making us happy will decrease over time. I.e. while we'd continue eating chocolate, the effect of us being happier because of it will decrease over time. This phenomenon is also called 'hedonic adaptation'. The same can be observed in my parts of our lives: e.g. in Austria, where I come from, people tend to complain when the bus or tram is 2min late. However, in other countries, you may not even have public transport or it leaves whenever. Since Austrians are so used to having public transport readily available, we rarely appreciate it anymore. And, from initially being happy of having had it, we even tend to get angry when it isn't available once. What is one aspect of your life where you have observed hedonic adaptation? p.s. this has been studied extensively in research. One such research article is "Give It Up: A Strategy for Combating Hedonic Adaptation" (Quoidbach & Dunn, 2012)
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From Hustle Monster to Calm Warrior: Daily science-backed hacks by a Harvard grad for a stress-free you & a life that truly feels good.
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